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Dave, a guy I know from work, is part of the Fort Wayne meetup for Dean. I may go on August 6th if Andrea wouldn't mind going with me.
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I haven't looked too much into the presidential candidates yet, but from what little I've seen, I'm leaning toward Howard Dean if he wins the Democrat primary. Here's a quote from a recent entry from Lawrence Lessig's blog (cyberlaw.stanford.edu), which Dean is guest-blogging this week.

I opposed the war not because I’m a pacifist—I’m not—but because the evidence presented did not justify preemptive war. I opposed needle exchanges for drug addicts until I saw the empirical evidence that showed how such exchanges reduce the spread of disease. I changed my position, and I’m proud of that. Facts are a better basis for decisions than ideology.


Howard Dean is a doctor of medicine and a former Governor of Vermont.
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Last night, I finished reading Understanding Comics: the Invisible Art by Scott McCloud. It's a lot deeper than it looks (cover image). I heartily recommend it for anyone who wants to understand comics or Art in general. In the penultimate chapter, McCloud does a kick-ass job of explaining Art in a way in which I've never heard it explained.
hacking, nerdy

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Here's an interesting (read: nerdy) thought. Most of today's processors use a 32-bit architecture. This means that the most memory a computer can use is 4GB. New processors are coming out that have a 64-bit architecture. These new computers will be able to use 16EB. That is sixteen exabytes, which is a lot. Here's a cool way to think about it: if you wanted to buy a lot computers with 4GB of RAM each, you would need to buy over four billion computers to have a total of 16EB.
4GB  =              4,294,967,296 Bytes
16EB = 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 Bytes
  • Current Mood
    nerdy nerdy
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If you hear anyone pronounce the article "ye" with a 'y' sound, remember the following: (from dictionary.com)

ye1  (th, y)
def.art. Archaic
The.


[Misreading of ye, from Middle English þe, spelling of the, the (using the letter thorn).]
Usage Note: In an attempt to seem quaint or old-fashioned, many store signs such as “Ye Olde Coffee Shoppe” use spellings that are no longer current. The word ye in such signs looks identical to the archaic second plural pronoun ye, but it is in fact not the same word. Ye in “Ye Olde Coffee Shoppe” is just an older spelling of the definite article the. The y in this ye was never pronounced (y) but was rather the result of improvisation by early printers. In Old English and early Middle English, the sound (th) was represented by the letter thorn (þ). When printing presses were first set up in England in the 1470s, the type and the typesetters all came from Continental Europe, where this letter was not in use. The letter y was used instead because in the handwriting of the day the thorn was very similar to y. Thus we see such spellings as ye for the, yt or yat for that, and so on well into the 19th century. However, the modern revival of the archaic spelling of the has not been accompanied by a revival of the knowledge of how it was pronounced, with the result that (y) is the usual pronunciation today.